All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Lee Harvey Oswald Shooting

Lee Harvey Oswald's Mug Shot

Lee Harvey Oswald's Mug Shot

Dallas, Texas
Monday, December 24, 2012

The Sixth Floor Museum in Dallas hosts five eyewitnesses of the Lee Harvey Oswald shooting, including news reporters and the police detective who was handcuffed to the prisoner. Oswald was suspected of killing President Kennedy and was being transported to the Dallas courthouse when Jack Ruby shot him in the basement of the police department on November 24, 1963. Oswald died hours later. Panelists discuss their experiences from that day and talk about the impact of the event on the media and on their lives.

From the Collections of The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza
KRLD-TV footage, KDFW Collection
George Reid Film, George Reid Collection
KLIF Radio footage, Steve Eberhart Collection

Additional Footage and Images
WBAP-TV footage, Courtesy KXAS-TV/NBC5-Dallas Fort Worth
Oswald shooting photographs, Courtesy Bob Jackson

Updated: Saturday, December 8, 2012 at 12:40pm (ET)

Related Events

Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza and President Kennedy Assassination
Friday, February 3, 2012     

The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza is located in what was once the Texas School Book Depository in Dallas, the building from which Lee Harvey Oswald shot President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963. Museum curator Gary Mack spoke to a tour group led by historian Richard Norton Smith about how the museum presents the information about the assassination and ensuing investigations.

The Presidency: Assassination of President Kennedy
Tuesday, December 25, 2012     

In the years since President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas on November 22, 1963, numerous theories have surfaced about who shot the president and why. In this program, authors David Wrone, Gerald McKnight, David Kaiser and Max Holland dispute each others findings about what really happened in Dallas in 1963.

AHTV: Max Holland on the Kennedy Assassination
Saturday, February 13, 2010     

Journalist Max Holland speaks about his book The Kennedy Assassination Tapes, published by Knopf. He discusses the transcripts of Lyndon Johnson's conversations regarding the Kennedy Assassination, the ensuing Warren Commission, and its aftermath. After his presentation, Mr. Holland answers questions from members of the audience.

The Shooting of Lee Harvey Oswald
Saturday, August 6, 2011     

Former homicide detective James Leavelle looks back at the morning Lee Harvey Oswald was shot by Jack Ruby in Dallas, Texas, on November 24, 1963. At the time of the shooting Oswald was in police custody on suspicion of assassinating President John F. Kennedy two days earlier. Mr. Leavelle was Oswald’s police escort when Jack Ruby killed him in the midst of police, reporters, and live television cameras.

President Warren Harding’s Love Letters
Today     

We hear from a panel about the personal and political consequences of Warren Harding’s long term love affair. The affair predated the 29th president's administration. Surviving love letters detailing the relationship were until very recently kept under seal by the Library of Congress, which hosted this event. The former president’s grandnephew, Richard Harding, explains why his family insisted on keeping the letters sealed and how the family continues to deal with the fallout from the affair and its impact on Warren Harding’s legacy.

National World War I Memorial
Today     

Edwin Fountain of the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission discusses efforts to re-develop Pershing Park in Washington, DC as a site to commemorate those who sacrificed their lives during World War I. Currently the park is the site of a memorial to General John Pershing, who commanded the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I.

Establishment of Religious Freedom in U.S.
Today     

Author Thomas Buckley discusses the establishment of religious freedom in the U.S. Mr. Buckley focuses on Virginia’s groundbreaking statute on religious freedom authored by Thomas Jefferson and its role in bringing freedom of religion to the newly independent United States. Buckley also describes how the statute’s influence has extended into the 20th century and the Supreme Court’s modern interpretation of the separation of church and state.

The Life of Westerner Tom Horn: 1860 - 1903
Today     

Author Larry Ball discusses the life and legacy of westerner Tom Horn, who lived from 1860 to 1903. Ball describes Horn’s work as a gunman for the Pinkerton Detective Agency and Wyoming Cattlemen's Association, as well as his murder conviction and execution in 1903. The New Mexico History Museum hosted the event.

History Bookshelf: Jim Crow Laws & School Integration
Today     

Author Rawn James describes Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall’s early career and profiles his mentor, Charles Hamilton Houston. The two lawyers led the NAACP’s legal office in challenging Jim Crow laws with a focus on school integration.

Atomic Bomb Survivors & President Truman’s Grandson
Today     

President Truman’s grandson, Clifton Truman Daniel, joins atomic bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki to discuss the lasting legacy of the nuclear attacks that ended World War II in the Pacific. It was President Truman who ordered the bombs dropped on the Japanese cities. We’ll hear the survivors describe the attacks as they experienced them – and the lasting emotional and physical effects of the bombings. This event was hosted by the Japan Society. 

Share This Event Via Social Media
American History TV