All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Lee Harvey Oswald Shooting

Lee Harvey Oswald's Mug Shot

Lee Harvey Oswald's Mug Shot

Dallas, Texas
Monday, December 24, 2012

The Sixth Floor Museum in Dallas hosts five eyewitnesses of the Lee Harvey Oswald shooting, including news reporters and the police detective who was handcuffed to the prisoner. Oswald was suspected of killing President Kennedy and was being transported to the Dallas courthouse when Jack Ruby shot him in the basement of the police department on November 24, 1963. Oswald died hours later. Panelists discuss their experiences from that day and talk about the impact of the event on the media and on their lives.

From the Collections of The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza
KRLD-TV footage, KDFW Collection
George Reid Film, George Reid Collection
KLIF Radio footage, Steve Eberhart Collection

Additional Footage and Images
WBAP-TV footage, Courtesy KXAS-TV/NBC5-Dallas Fort Worth
Oswald shooting photographs, Courtesy Bob Jackson

Updated: Saturday, December 8, 2012 at 12:40pm (ET)

Related Events

Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza and President Kennedy Assassination
Friday, February 3, 2012     

The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza is located in what was once the Texas School Book Depository in Dallas, the building from which Lee Harvey Oswald shot President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963. Museum curator Gary Mack spoke to a tour group led by historian Richard Norton Smith about how the museum presents the information about the assassination and ensuing investigations.

The Presidency: Assassination of President Kennedy
Tuesday, December 25, 2012     

In the years since President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas on November 22, 1963, numerous theories have surfaced about who shot the president and why. In this program, authors David Wrone, Gerald McKnight, David Kaiser and Max Holland dispute each others findings about what really happened in Dallas in 1963.

AHTV: Max Holland on the Kennedy Assassination
Saturday, February 13, 2010     

Journalist Max Holland speaks about his book The Kennedy Assassination Tapes, published by Knopf. He discusses the transcripts of Lyndon Johnson's conversations regarding the Kennedy Assassination, the ensuing Warren Commission, and its aftermath. After his presentation, Mr. Holland answers questions from members of the audience.

The Shooting of Lee Harvey Oswald
Saturday, August 6, 2011     

Former homicide detective James Leavelle looks back at the morning Lee Harvey Oswald was shot by Jack Ruby in Dallas, Texas, on November 24, 1963. At the time of the shooting Oswald was in police custody on suspicion of assassinating President John F. Kennedy two days earlier. Mr. Leavelle was Oswald’s police escort when Jack Ruby killed him in the midst of police, reporters, and live television cameras.

The Civil War: Remembering the Battle of the Crater
Wednesday     

Author Kevin Levin discusses the role of the U.S. Colored Troops in the Battle of the Crater, and the way their contributions were remembered in the years following the Civil War. The Battle of the Crater took place July 30, 1864, as part of the Union Army’s siege of Petersburg.

The Civil War: Battle of Fort Stevens 150th Anniversary
Tuesday     

Officials from the National Park Service and Washington, DC, commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Fort Stevens. The battle took place July 11-12th, 1864, when Confederate forces under Gen. Jubal Early probed Washington, DC’s defenses before turning back. 

The Presidency: Presidents & the CIA
Sunday     

Author and intelligence expert Melvin Goodman describes the history of the relationship between the White House and the Central Intelligence Agency from the Truman years through today. He explains how President Truman's "quiet intelligence arm" became a politicized source of covert actions around the world from the Bay of Pigs invasion to the Iran Contra affair. The National Archives at Kansas City hosted this event. 

A Century Later: Reassessing World War I
Sunday     

World War I officially began on July 28, 1914 when Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. Less than a month later, most of Europe had joined the war. As the world marks the centennial of the beginning of the conflict, the National World War I Museum in Kansas City hosts a panel of historians and authors who talk about the causes and effects of the conflict once known as the “war to end all wars.”

Reel America: "A Conversation with Herbert Hoover" - 1960
Sunday     

In this hour-long 1960 NBC interview, Herbert Hoover discusses his life beyond the presidency. Speaking with reporter Ray Henle, he delves into topics including his childhood, his time in China during the Boxer Rebellion and his involvement supplying food to civilians in German-occupied Belgium during WWI. This program is part of the collections of the Stanford University Libraries Department of Special Collections and University Archives.  

History of Casper, Wyoming
Sunday     

Our C-SPAN Cities Tour takes American History TV on the road. We feature the history of Casper, Wyoming throughout the weekend of August 16-18.

Share This Event Via Social Media
Washington Journal (late 2012)
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org