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Lectures in History: Women’s Sports & Title IX

Title IX author Sen. Birch Bayh (D-IN) at Purdue University (1970s)

Title IX author Sen. Birch Bayh (D-IN) at Purdue University (1970s)

Washington, DC
Saturday, April 26, 2014

Georgetown University professor Bonnie Morris discusses discrimination against women in sports and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. Title IX prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in any federally funded education program or activity.

Updated: Sunday, April 27, 2014 at 11:58am (ET)

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