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Lectures in History: Women in the Early Republic

1775 British cartoon satirizing politically active women in America

1775 British cartoon satirizing politically active women in America

Riverside, California
Saturday, March 1, 2014

Revolutionary War history courses generally teach students about the actions of men on the battlefield. But women's lives during that time were largely centered on the home, and any political influence they achieved was through their husbands. In this class, Professor Catherine Allgor of the University of California-Riverside teaches about the lives of women in the early American republic.

Updated: Sunday, March 2, 2014 at 5:45pm (ET)

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