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Lectures in History: U.S. & United Nations Response to Rwandan Genocide

Pictures of Rwandan Genocide Victims

Pictures of Rwandan Genocide Victims

St. Augustine, Florida
Tuesday, July 1, 2014

On “Lectures in History,” Flagler College professors Arthur Vanden Houton and John Young teach a class on the Rwandan Genocide and the response by the U.S. and the United Nations. The professors place particular emphasis on the slow reaction to the crisis from the international community and look at how the Rwandan Genocide has shaped 21st century foreign policy for many countries. 

Updated: Wednesday, July 2, 2014 at 3:50pm (ET)

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