All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Lectures in History: Transatlantic Slave Trade

18th-century painting of an African family in Peru

18th-century painting of an African family in Peru

New York City
Saturday, May 25, 2013

New York University professor Michael Gomez teaches a class on the transatlantic slave trade from the 16th century into 19th century. Professor Gomez discusses the countries involved and the methods used in the procurement of slaves, such as raiding and kidnapping. He also discusses the complex history of Africans dealing in the slave trade to pay debts and to punish neighboring factions.

Updated: Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 9:42am (ET)

Related Events

Lectures in History: Lincoln, Slavery & Emancipation
Saturday, April 20, 2013     

President Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation on September 22nd, 1862. It ordered the emancipation of all slaves in any Confederate state that did not return to the Union by January 1st, 1863. No Confederate states returned, and Lincoln signed and issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863. Professor George Forgie discusses the evolution of Lincoln’s thinking on slavery, and the political and legal factors Lincoln considered when issuing the Emancipation Proclamation. This class is from the University of Texas at Austin.

Lectures in History: Slavery, Secession & the Civil War
Saturday, October 13, 2012     

History professor Susan Schulten discusses the causes of America's Civil War, including President Abraham Lincoln's refusal to allow slavery to expand into new territories. Professor Schulten explains that President Lincoln refused to recognize the Confederacy as legitimate and viewed secession as illegal. This class took place at the University of Denver.

American Artifacts: Underground Railroad & Slavery Experience
Sunday, August 5, 2012     

Button Farm Living History Center is a work-in-progress dedicated to depicting 19th-century slave plantation life. Through their programs and activities they strive to give visitors the experience of working as a slave, and also experiencing the perils of escaping to freedom on the Underground Railroad.  American History TV traveled 30 miles northwest of the nation's Capitol to visit the farm and learn about the non-profit Menare Foundation.

Slavery at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello
Saturday, July 21, 2012     

Lucia Stanton, senior historian at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, has been studying and writing about Thomas Jefferson and his enslaved community for more than 30 years. In this program, she argues that the President sometimes treated his slaves as human beings and at other times as property. Using thousands of records kept by the third president, Stanton attempts to imagine what life was like from the point of view of the slaves. She is joined by historian Dianne Swann-Wright to discuss their ongoing oral history project that has collected the stories of over 170 descendants of Monticello’s slaves.

President Abraham Lincoln & the Expansion of Slavery
Sunday, August 8, 2010     

Abraham Lincoln’s opposition to the expansion of slavery in the West was a key factor on his decision to enter national politics. Pulitzer-prize winning historian James McPherson spoke about Lincoln’s connection to the West at the Lincoln Forum in Gettysburg.

Lectures in History: Life & Legacy of Booker T. Washington
Saturday     

Mercer University professor Chester Fontenot examines the life and legacy of Booker T. Washington. Fontenot talks about Washington’s early years at Tuskegee University and looks at his ideological platform which encouraged African Americans to establish their own economic base. While Washington helped create many institutions for African Americans, such as the National Negro Business League, he also had opposition to his ideas, both during his lifetime and since. Fontenot also compares the ideas and tactics of Booker T. Washington and Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. 

Lectures in History: Colonial America & King George’s War
Saturday, October 11, 2014     

Iowa State University professor Timothy Wolters talks about King George’s War, which took place in the 1740s in North America between European colonial powers. While the fighting in the war was ultimately inconclusive, it did help establish regional identities for the colonies. Also, the fighting gave American colonists valuable experience for their own revolution in the coming years. 

Lectures in History: Remembering the Civil War
Saturday, September 27, 2014     

Central Connecticut State University professor Robert Wolff and his class examine how the memory of the Civil War has changed from its 50th and 100th anniversaries to the present. 

Lectures in History: Civil Rights & the “War on Poverty”
Saturday, September 20, 2014     

Oregon State University professor Marisa Chappell discusses the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s and the anti-poverty and entitlement programs that were part of President Lyndon Johnson’s “War on Poverty.” She also details the societal attitudes toward impoverished minorities at the time, focusing on the challenges faced by single mothers. 

Lectures in History: Korean War POWs
Saturday, September 13, 2014     

U.S. Naval Academy history professor Lori Bogle teaches a class on the American soldiers taken prisoner during the Korean War, including the effects of captivity and attempts at political indoctrination. 

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

C-SPAN on Facebook (late 2012)