All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Lectures in History: Transatlantic Slave Trade

18th-century painting of an African family in Peru

18th-century painting of an African family in Peru

New York City
Saturday, May 25, 2013

New York University professor Michael Gomez teaches a class on the transatlantic slave trade from the 16th century into 19th century. Professor Gomez discusses the countries involved and the methods used in the procurement of slaves, such as raiding and kidnapping. He also discusses the complex history of Africans dealing in the slave trade to pay debts and to punish neighboring factions.

Updated: Tuesday, May 28, 2013 at 9:42am (ET)

Related Events

Lectures in History: Lincoln, Slavery & Emancipation
Saturday, April 20, 2013     

President Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation on September 22nd, 1862. It ordered the emancipation of all slaves in any Confederate state that did not return to the Union by January 1st, 1863. No Confederate states returned, and Lincoln signed and issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863. Professor George Forgie discusses the evolution of Lincoln’s thinking on slavery, and the political and legal factors Lincoln considered when issuing the Emancipation Proclamation. This class is from the University of Texas at Austin.

Lectures in History: Slavery, Secession & the Civil War
Saturday, October 13, 2012     

History professor Susan Schulten discusses the causes of America's Civil War, including President Abraham Lincoln's refusal to allow slavery to expand into new territories. Professor Schulten explains that President Lincoln refused to recognize the Confederacy as legitimate and viewed secession as illegal. This class took place at the University of Denver.

American Artifacts: Underground Railroad & Slavery Experience
Sunday, August 5, 2012     

Button Farm Living History Center is a work-in-progress dedicated to depicting 19th-century slave plantation life. Through their programs and activities they strive to give visitors the experience of working as a slave, and also experiencing the perils of escaping to freedom on the Underground Railroad.  American History TV traveled 30 miles northwest of the nation's Capitol to visit the farm and learn about the non-profit Menare Foundation.

Slavery at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello
Saturday, July 21, 2012     

Lucia Stanton, senior historian at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, has been studying and writing about Thomas Jefferson and his enslaved community for more than 30 years. In this program, she argues that the President sometimes treated his slaves as human beings and at other times as property. Using thousands of records kept by the third president, Stanton attempts to imagine what life was like from the point of view of the slaves. She is joined by historian Dianne Swann-Wright to discuss their ongoing oral history project that has collected the stories of over 170 descendants of Monticello’s slaves.

President Abraham Lincoln & the Expansion of Slavery
Sunday, August 8, 2010     

Abraham Lincoln’s opposition to the expansion of slavery in the West was a key factor on his decision to enter national politics. Pulitzer-prize winning historian James McPherson spoke about Lincoln’s connection to the West at the Lincoln Forum in Gettysburg.

Lectures in History: Experiences of World War I Soldiers
Saturday     

Gettysburg College history professor Ian Isherwood looks at how World War I soldiers interpreted their war experiences. Professor Isherwood uses works by three writers, including Ernest Hemingway, to illustrate the different ways soldiers coped with the transition to civilian life after they endured physical and mental trauma during the war.

Lectures in History: Women’s Liberation Movement
Saturday, July 19, 2014     

Monmouth College history professor Stacy Cordery and her students discuss the ideals and goals that drove feminists and the Women’s Liberation Movement in the late 1960s and early 1970s.The class examines several essays published by feminist writers of the time to explore the intellectual underpinnings of the movement. Monmouth College is in Illinois. 

Lectures in History: The French in Colonial North America
Saturday, July 12, 2014     

College of William & Mary history professor Brett Rushforth discusses France’s impact on North America in the early 1700s. He also details the territorial tensions between the French and Great Britain that brought the Seven Years' War to North America.

Lectures in History: U.S. Cold War Human Radiation Experiments
Saturday, July 5, 2014     

University of Michigan history professor Joel Howell teaches a class on human radiation experiments conducted by the Defense Department from the end of World War II through the Cold War. Professor Howell describes tests – ranging from plutonium injections to full body radiation exposure -- and their subjects, including cancer patients, prisoners and children, many of whom did not give consent nor understand the associated risks.

Lectures in History: U.S. & United Nations Response to Rwandan Genocide
Tuesday, July 1, 2014     

On “Lectures in History,” Flagler College professors Arthur Vanden Houton and John Young teach a class on the Rwandan Genocide and the response by the U.S. and the United Nations. The professors place particular emphasis on the slow reaction to the crisis from the international community and look at how the Rwandan Genocide has shaped 21st century foreign policy for many countries. 

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

C-SPAN on Twitter (late 2012)
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org