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Lectures in History: The Private Lyndon Baines Johnson

President Lyndon B. Johnson (August 1967)

President Lyndon B. Johnson (August 1967)

Austin, Texas
Saturday, July 6, 2013

Harry Middleton and Robert Hardesty - former speechwriters for President Lyndon Johnson - recall personal conversations and private moments they shared with LBJ. They also read written material from Johnson that was excluded from his formal addresses.  This class is from a course called “The Johnson Years,” which is a University of Texas at Austin class taught at the Lyndon B. Presidential Library. 

Updated: Monday, July 15, 2013 at 1:28pm (ET)

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