All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Lectures in History: The Motivations of Civil War Soldiers

Union soldiers, 1864

Union soldiers, 1864

Fairfax, Virginia
Saturday, May 31, 2014

George Mason University history professor Christopher Hamner teaches a class on the motivations Civil War soldiers had when enlisting, fighting and choosing to stay in the Union and Confederate armies.

Updated: Tuesday, June 3, 2014 at 11:45am (ET)

Related Events

Lectures in History: Civil War Prisons
Sunday, February 12, 2012     

Old Dominion University professor Timothy Orr teaches a course on the Civil War and Reconstruction. In this lecture, he discusses how Union and Confederate forces handled prisoners of war, and takes a look conditions inside some Civil War prison camps. Old Dominion University is located in Norfolk, Virginia.

Lectures in History: Generalship of Robert E. Lee
Saturday, April 28, 2012     

U.S. Naval Academy History Professor Wayne Hsieh examines the Generalship of Robert E. Lee.  This class is part of a course called, "The American Way of War."

Lectures in History: Generalship of Ulysses S. Grant
Saturday, April 28, 2012     

U.S. Naval Academy History Professor Wayne Hsieh examines the Generalship of Ulysses S. Grant.  This class is part of a course called, "The American Way of War."

Lectures in History: Evolving Nature of the Civil War
Saturday, June 22, 2013     

Florida Atlantic University professor Stephen Engle teaches a class on the evolving nature of the Civil War. Among the issues discussed: President Lincoln’s decision to issue the Emancipation Proclamation in the middle of the war -- and to use former slaves as troops – and how these ideas changed the Civil War from a fight to preserve the Union, to one about abolishing slavery, thus altering the nation forever. Florida Atlantic University is in Boca Raton. 
 

Lectures in History: Guerrilla Warfare in the Civil War
Saturday, December 7, 2013     

Brown University professor Megan Kate Nelson examines guerrilla warfare in the American Civil War. Guerrilla warfare is largely characterized by its tactics, including ambushes and surprise raids on unsuspecting troops and towns. There were bands of guerrilla soldiers fighting on both the Union and Confederate sides during the Civil War. These small bands of men on horseback were very nimble and difficult to capture, especially Confederate guerrillas who often did not wear uniforms and blended back into the population after an attack. Brown University is in Providence, Rhode Island.

Lectures in History: Civil War Memory & "The Lost Cause"
Saturday, January 25, 2014     

University of Maryland, Baltimore County professor Anne Sarah Rubin teaches a class on how the Civil War was remembered in the decades following the conflict, with a focus on the former Confederate states. She looks at the creation of cemeteries and monuments to honor the Confederate dead. She also talks about the Southern Historical Society and how it helped foster the “Lost Cause” myth, which promoted an idealized view of the pre-war South and portrayed the Confederate cause as a noble one that failed only because of the North’s overwhelming resources. And she discusses the formation of the United Confederate Veterans group, which held celebrated reunions with its Northern counterparts.

The Presidency: George Washington & the Frontier
Sunday     

After the American Revolution – and before he was elected the first president of the United States – George Washington retired from public life. During that time, he traveled to western Virginia to check on his landholdings. Author Edward Larson talks about this journey and how it contributed to Washington’s interest in western expansion and propelled his efforts to link the east and west through the Potomac River. George Washington’s Mount Vernon hosted this event. 

JFK Assassination and the CIA
Sunday     

Retired U.S. Army Intelligence officer & former NSA executive assistant John Newman discusses declassified documents and codenames related to the CIA, Cuba & the assassination.  Newman is the author of “JFK and Vietnam” and “Oswald and the CIA.” This is part of an Assassination Archives and Research Center conference marking the 50th anniversary of the release of the Warren Commission Report entitled, “The Warren Report and the JFK Assassination: A Half Century of Significant Disclosures.”  

American Artifacts: Russell Senate Office Building
Sunday     

Opened in 1909, the Russell Senate Office Building relieved crowded conditions in the U.S. Capitol. Senate Historian Donald Ritchie explains why the Senate needed to expand and describes some of the many historic investigations that have taken place in the Senate Caucus Room, including the 1912 Titanic & the 1920s Teapot Dome hearings. This is the first of a two-part program.

Multiracial Coalitions & Civil Rights
Sunday     

A former member of the Black Panther Party, Bill Jennings, joins author Lauren Araiza to discuss multiracial coalitions during the civil rights movements of the 1960s and 70s.

Share This Event Via Social Media
C-SPAN's Video Library