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Lectures in History: The Motivations of Civil War Soldiers

Union soldiers, 1864

Union soldiers, 1864

Fairfax, Virginia
Saturday, May 31, 2014

George Mason University history professor Christopher Hamner teaches a class on the motivations Civil War soldiers had when enlisting, fighting and choosing to stay in the Union and Confederate armies.

Updated: Tuesday, June 3, 2014 at 11:45am (ET)

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