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Lectures in History: The Intellectual George Washington

"The Washington Family" by Edward Savage

Mount Vernon, Virginia
Saturday, November 2, 2013

George Washington University’s Denver Brunsman discusses the topic of George Washington as an intellectual. When Washington was 11 years old, his father died, all but extinguishing his hopes of going to college. His lack of a university education bothered him his entire life, and peers John Adams and Thomas Jefferson – while respecting Washington’s character - were at times critical of his lack of a formal education. Professor Brunsman points out that throughout Washington’s life, he never lost his passion for learning nor his intellectual curiosity. He was a veracious reader on a variety of topics, teaching himself through his own research and effort. Washington also respected and remained dedicated to education, always pushing his step-children and grandchildren to peruse higher learning. This George Washington University class takes place at the National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon.

Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014 at 12:51pm (ET)

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