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Lectures in History: Religious Identity in Early America

Philadelphia's 1844 Anti-Catholic Bible Riots

Philadelphia's 1844 Anti-Catholic Bible Riots

Fairfax, Virginia
Saturday, July 27, 2013

George Mason University professor Rosemarie Zagarri examines the history of religion and religious identity in America from the Colonial period to the Civil War. Some of the groups discussed include the Puritans in New England, the Quakers in Pennsylvania, and the Irish Catholics who settled in cities along the East Coast. George Mason University is in Fairfax, Virginia.
 

Updated: Monday, July 29, 2013 at 10:33am (ET)

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