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Lectures in History: Neoconservatism & Culture Wars of the 1980s & 1990s

Protests against Welfare Reform in Los Angeles (1996)

Protests against Welfare Reform in Los Angeles (1996)

Washington, DC
Saturday, May 10, 2014

Stanford University history professor Albert Camarillo teaches a class on the end of New Deal liberalism and the rise of neoconservatism as marked by the ascendency of Ronald Reagan. This political shift was accompanied by what Professor Camarillo calls the “culture war battles” of the 1980s and 1990s, and included conservative backlash against welfare and affirmative action. 

Updated: Sunday, May 11, 2014 at 12:48pm (ET)

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