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Lectures in History: Korean War POWs

American POWs in North Korea, 1952

American POWs in North Korea, 1952

Annapolis, Maryland
Monday, May 26, 2014

U.S. Naval Academy history professor Lori Bogle teaches a class on the American soldiers taken prisoner during the Korean War. Professor Bogle explains how the warring nations used prisoners to intimidate their enemies and describes the effects of captivity and attempts by the enemy at political indoctrination.

Updated: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 at 9:41am (ET)

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