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Lectures in History: Jews in the Progressive Era

Jews in New York City, 1908

Jews in New York City, 1908

Washington, DC
Saturday, April 19, 2014

Georgetown University Professor Jonathan Ray looks at the lives of American Jews in the Progressive Era, including questions about Jewish assimilation into the wider American culture. He discusses Jewish support of socialism and organized labor, as well as issues of discrimination against Jews in the workplace and in society. He also examines ethnic, racial and religious differences within the Jewish community itself. 

Updated: Monday, April 21, 2014 at 10:44am (ET)

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Washington Journal (late 2012)
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