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Lectures in History: Holocaust Graphic Novel “Maus”

Graphic Novel

Graphic Novel "Maus" by Art Spiegelman

Boca Raton, Florida
Saturday, January 11, 2014

In this class, Florida Atlantic University Holocaust Studies Chair Alan Berger discusses Art Spiegelman’s graphic novel “Maus,” which depicts the author’s relationship with his father, a Holocaust survivor. Speigelman composed his work not only from conversations with his father, but from reading Holocaust survivor accounts and studying artwork by concentration camp prisoners. Florida Atlantic University is in Boca Raton. 

 

 

Updated: Monday, January 13, 2014 at 12:39pm (ET)

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