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Lectures in History: FDR and the New Deal

President Roosevelt signs the Social Security Act (August 14, 1935)

President Roosevelt signs the Social Security Act (August 14, 1935)

Charlottesville, Virginia
Saturday, September 21, 2013

University of Virginia professor Sidney Milkis discusses President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal domestic economic programs enacted between 1933 and 1936. Roosevelt’s New Deal programs included the Emergency Banking Bill, the Agricultural Adjustment Administration, the Works Progress Administration, the National Labor Relations Act, and Social Security -  among others. Professor Milkis also discusses Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms address and Norman Rockwell’s depictions of those ideals. The University of Virginia is located in Charlottesville.

Updated: Thursday, January 16, 2014 at 12:42pm (ET)

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