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Lectures in History: Evolving Nature of the Civil War

President Lincoln & Gen. McClellan in Antietam, Maryland (1862)

President Lincoln & Gen. McClellan in Antietam, Maryland (1862)

Boca Raton, Florida
Saturday, June 22, 2013

Florida Atlantic University professor Stephen Engle teaches a class on the evolving nature of the Civil War. Among the issues discussed: President Lincoln’s decision to issue the Emancipation Proclamation in the middle of the war -- and to use former slaves as troops – and how these ideas changed the Civil War from a fight to preserve the Union, to one about abolishing slavery, thus altering the nation forever. Florida Atlantic University is in Boca Raton. 
 

Updated: Monday, June 24, 2013 at 10:01am (ET)

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