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Lectures in History: Ernie Pyle & War Reporting

Ernie Pyle on a U.S. Navy Transport, 1945

Ernie Pyle on a U.S. Navy Transport, 1945

Oxford, Ohio
Saturday, May 17, 2014

Miami University journalism professor James Tobin teaches a class on the life of World War II reporter Ernie Pyle and his influence on war reporting.

Updated: Sunday, May 18, 2014 at 4:13pm (ET)

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