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Lectures in History: Egypt & the Origins of Al-Qaeda

Ayman al-Zawahri, Egyptian doctor & now Al-Qaeda leader, in 1998

Ayman al-Zawahri, Egyptian doctor & now Al-Qaeda leader, in 1998

Ann Arbor, Michigan
Saturday, March 8, 2014

Juan Cole is a history professor at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. In his course, “America and Middle Eastern Wars,” he teaches a class looking at Egypt and the origins of Al-Qaeda. Professor Cole traces the roots of the terrorist group from the British invasion of Egypt in 1882, through the birth of the Muslim Brotherhood in 1928 as a reaction against Western influence. He also talks about the assassination of Anwar Sadat in 1981 in the wake of the Israel-Egypt peace agreement, and the role played by Egyptian expatriates fighting the Soviets in Afghanistan in the 1980s. 

Updated: Sunday, March 9, 2014 at 11:17pm (ET)

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