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Lectures in History: Civil War Memory & "The Lost Cause"

"The Lost Cause," 1870s lithograph with Confederate currency

Baltimore
Saturday, January 25, 2014

University of Maryland, Baltimore County professor Anne Sarah Rubin teaches a class on how the Civil War was remembered in the decades following the conflict, with a focus on the former Confederate states. She looks at the creation of cemeteries and monuments to honor the Confederate dead. She also talks about the Southern Historical Society and how it helped foster the “Lost Cause” myth, which promoted an idealized view of the pre-war South and portrayed the Confederate cause as a noble one that failed only because of the North’s overwhelming resources. And she discusses the formation of the United Confederate Veterans group, which held celebrated reunions with its Northern counterparts.

Updated: Wednesday, January 29, 2014 at 12:11am (ET)

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