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Lectures in History: Civil Rights Movement

Rosa Parks Being Arrested & Fingerprinted (February 22, 1956)

Rosa Parks Being Arrested & Fingerprinted (February 22, 1956)

Fairfield, Connecticut
Saturday, August 10, 2013

Fairfield University professor Yohuru Williams looks at the Civil Rights era and compares it to other movements in American history. He also argues that the teaching of the Civil Rights Movement is too focused on leaders like Martin Luther King Jr., excluding the multitude who sacrificed and worked for equality, and especially minimizing the role of women. He points out the contributions of such activists as Daisy Bates, Jo Ann Robinson and Rosa Parks as being overlooked. This class took place at Fairfield University in Connecticut.
 

Updated: Monday, August 12, 2013 at 10:29am (ET)

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