All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Lectures in History: Civil Rights Movement 1955-1968

Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr.

Baltimore, Maryland
Saturday, June 1, 2013

Goucher College professor Jean Baker teaches a class on the Civil Right Movement, from Rosa Parks refusal to move to the back of the bus in 1955, to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968. The class also engages in a discussion on a book of oral histories by journalist Howell Raines titled, “My Soul is Rested: The Story of the Civil Rights Movement in the Deep South.” Goucher College is in Baltimore, Maryland. This class is an hour and 15 minutes. 

Updated: Monday, June 3, 2013 at 10:42am (ET)

Related Events

Lectures in History: Music of the Civil Rights Movement
Sunday, February 26, 2012     

University of Michigan history professor Kevin Gaines on the music of the civil rights and black power movement. Several songs and slides are featured during the class.

Lectures in History: The Civil Rights Movement
Saturday, June 2, 2012     

University of Washington American History Professor Quintard Taylor looks at the Civil Rights Movement from the 1940s through the 1960s.  Professor Taylor focuses on the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court Decision on Brown v. Board of Education and the 1957 integration of Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Lectures in History: Martin Luther King Jr. in Birmingham, Alabama
Monday, January 21, 2013     

University of Hartford professor Warren Goldstein discusses Martin Luther King, Jr.'s time spent in Birmingham, Alabama, and the Civil Rights movement there in 1963.

Lectures in History: Black Power Movement in the 1960s
Saturday, February 23, 2013     

Professor Howard Brick of the University of Michigan examines the Black Power Movement in the 1960s. While the Civil Rights Movement led by Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. sought equality through non-violent civil disobedience, an emerging Black Power Movement in the mid-1960s -- guided variously by Malcolm X, Stokley Carmichael and the leaders of the Black Panther Party -- sought change through black nationalism and separatism. Professor Brick explores the roots and causes for this transformation in the struggle for African American equality.
 

Lectures in History: Modernizing the Home and Workplace
Saturday     

Vanderbilt University professor Sarah Igo talks about the societal shift that occurred during the early 20th century as as modernization impacted businesses and households. Igo focuses on the literary works of individuals such as Christine Frederick, proponent of home economics, and Frederick Winslow Taylor, who sought to improve industrial efficiency. 

Lectures in History: Life & Legacy of Booker T. Washington
Saturday, October 18, 2014     

Mercer University professor Chester Fontenot examines the life and legacy of Booker T. Washington. Fontenot talks about Washington’s early years at Tuskegee University and looks at his ideological platform which encouraged African Americans to establish their own economic base. While Washington helped create many institutions for African Americans, such as the National Negro Business League, he also had opposition to his ideas, both during his lifetime and since. Fontenot also compares the ideas and tactics of Booker T. Washington and Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. 

Lectures in History: Colonial America & King George’s War
Saturday, October 11, 2014     

Iowa State University professor Timothy Wolters talks about King George’s War, which took place in the 1740s in North America between European colonial powers. While the fighting in the war was ultimately inconclusive, it did help establish regional identities for the colonies. Also, the fighting gave American colonists valuable experience for their own revolution in the coming years. 

Lectures in History: Remembering the Civil War
Saturday, September 27, 2014     

Central Connecticut State University professor Robert Wolff and his class examine how the memory of the Civil War has changed from its 50th and 100th anniversaries to the present. 

Lectures in History: Civil Rights & the “War on Poverty”
Saturday, September 20, 2014     

Oregon State University professor Marisa Chappell discusses the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s and the anti-poverty and entitlement programs that were part of President Lyndon Johnson’s “War on Poverty.” She also details the societal attitudes toward impoverished minorities at the time, focusing on the challenges faced by single mothers. 

Lectures in History: Korean War POWs
Saturday, September 13, 2014     

U.S. Naval Academy history professor Lori Bogle teaches a class on the American soldiers taken prisoner during the Korean War, including the effects of captivity and attempts at political indoctrination. 

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

American History TV