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Lectures in History: Civil Rights Movement 1955-1968

Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr.

Baltimore, Maryland
Saturday, June 1, 2013

Goucher College professor Jean Baker teaches a class on the Civil Right Movement, from Rosa Parks refusal to move to the back of the bus in 1955, to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in 1968. The class also engages in a discussion on a book of oral histories by journalist Howell Raines titled, “My Soul is Rested: The Story of the Civil Rights Movement in the Deep South.” Goucher College is in Baltimore, Maryland. This class is an hour and 15 minutes. 

Updated: Monday, June 3, 2013 at 10:42am (ET)

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