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Lectures in History: American Racial Concepts & Plessy v. Ferguson

Bowie, Maryland
Saturday, June 28, 2014

Bowie State University history professor Tamara Brown teaches a class on the American concept of race and how it factored into the Supreme Court’s 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson decision. The case served as the legal basis for segregation until it was overturned in the Court’s 1954 Brown v. Board ruling.

Updated: Monday, June 30, 2014 at 9:36am (ET)

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