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Lectures in History: African Americans & the Civil War

African American Union Civil War Troops

African American Union Civil War Troops

Cambridge, Massachusetts
Saturday, June 23, 2012

Harvard University professor John Stauffer discusses African Americans and the Civil War.  Professor Stauffer examines Abraham Lincoln's First Inaugural Address, focusing on the president's claim that secession was unconstitutional.  He also teaches about President Lincoln’s efforts to keep the border states in the Union, the Emancipation Proclamation, and the involvement of black soldiers in both the Union and Confederate Armies.
 

Updated: Monday, January 28, 2013 at 10:03am (ET)

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