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Lectures in History: 1955 Murder of Emmett Till

Emmett Till

Emmett Till

Fairfax, Virginia
Friday, August 23, 2013

Emmett Till was a 14-year-old African American boy from Chicago who in the summer of 1955 was visiting family in Mississippi. A few days after an incident at a local grocery store, Till was kidnapped from his relatives’ home and murdered. In this program, George Mason University professor Suzanne Smith and her class discuss the Emmett Till case, including details of his murder, the investigation and trial, race relations in Mississippi in the 1950s, and Till’s emotional funeral, which included an open casket so the damage done to him could be seen and photographed.

Updated: Monday, September 9, 2013 at 9:58am (ET)

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