All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Lectures in History: 1955 Murder of Emmett Till

Emmett Till

Emmett Till

Fairfax, Virginia
Friday, August 23, 2013

Emmett Till was a 14-year-old African American boy from Chicago who in the summer of 1955 was visiting family in Mississippi. A few days after an incident at a local grocery store, Till was kidnapped from his relatives’ home and murdered. In this program, George Mason University professor Suzanne Smith and her class discuss the Emmett Till case, including details of his murder, the investigation and trial, race relations in Mississippi in the 1950s, and Till’s emotional funeral, which included an open casket so the damage done to him could be seen and photographed.

Updated: Monday, September 9, 2013 at 9:58am (ET)

Related Events

Integration of the University of Mississippi
Saturday, September 22, 2012     

50 years ago in the fall of 1962, James Meredith became the first African American to attend the University of Mississippi. His enrollment set off civil rights demonstrations and a confrontation over the integration of the University between the Kennedy administration and Mississippi Governor Ross Barnett. This event was held in 2002 on the 40th anniversary of the incident, and includes comments by James Meredith and two former members of the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department, John Doar and Burke Marshall.

Integration of the University of Mississippi - 1962 Universal Newsreel
Saturday, September 22, 2012     

50 years ago in the fall of 1962, James Meredith became the first African American to attend the University of Mississippi.  His enrollment caused a major confrontation between the Kennedy administration and Mississippi Governor Ross Barnett.  This is a Newsreel about the incident.

Lyndon Johnson & J. Edgar Hoover Phone Calls on Murdered Civil Rights Workers
Saturday, August 6, 2011     

On June 21st, 1964 during what was called the “Freedom Summer” three civil rights workers were murdered in Philadelphia, Mississippi by the Ku Klux Klan.

"A Wreath for Emmett Till" - Marilyn Nelson
Sunday, August 29, 2010     

On August 28th, 1955, fourteen year old Emmett Till was brutally murdered in Mississippi. Till’s racially motivated murder served as a catalyst in the Civil Rights movement. Marilyn Nelson discusses her book, "A Wreath for Emmett Till,” a collection of poems created as a written memorial for the young man.

Lectures in History: Jews in the Progressive Era
Saturday     

Georgetown University Professor Jonathan Ray looks at the lives of American Jews in the Progressive Era, including questions about Jewish assimilation into the wider American culture. He discusses Jewish support of socialism and organized labor, as well as issues of discrimination against Jews in the workplace and in society. He also examines ethnic, racial and religious differences within the Jewish community itself. 

Lectures in History: Satchel Paige, Negro Leagues Baseball & Civil Rights
Saturday, April 12, 2014     

University of Miami history professor Donald Spivey teaches a class on African American baseball pitcher Satchel Paige and how he and those involved in the Negro Leagues contributed to the fight for civil rights. 

Lectures in History: World War II, the Pacific & the Atomic Bomb
Saturday, April 5, 2014     

U.S. Air Force Academy history professor Grant Weller teaches a class on America’s use of atomic bombs against Japan at the end of World War II. Professor Weller and his class discuss American and Japanese military strategies in the months leading up to the attacks at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The class also covers Japanese social and political attitudes, American motivation for dropping the bomb and the considerations involved in choosing target cities. 

Lectures in History: Muckraker Jacob Riis & Gilded Age New York City
Saturday, March 29, 2014     

Mount Holyoke College history professor Daniel Czitrom teaches a class on Jacob Riis, who was one of the pioneers of muckraking journalism. His photographs of life in New York City’s tenements during the Gilded Age highlighted the difficult living conditions there and his work was used to lobby for reform. An immigrant himself, Riis’ photography and book, “How the Other Half Lives,” gave insight into the lives of immigrants, many of whom were racial and religious minorities. 

Lectures in History: Gay Men & Lesbians in Early 20th Century America
Saturday, March 22, 2014     

Santa Clara University Professor Nancy Unger and her class discuss shifting American attitudes toward gay men and lesbians in the early 20th century.

Lectures in History: Andrew Johnson & the 14th Amendment
Saturday, March 15, 2014     

University of Maryland history professor Michael Ross teaches a class on Andrew Johnson, the beginnings of Reconstruction and the origins of the 14th Amendment.  Johnson was Lincoln's vice president, and ascended to the presidency following Lincoln's assassination in April 1865.

Share This Event Via Social Media
C-SPAN Radio
Questions? Comments? Email us at AmericanHistoryTV@c-span.org