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Lectures in History: 1944 Presidential Election

Franklin D. Roosevelt & Harry S. Truman

Franklin D. Roosevelt & Harry S. Truman

Lynchburg, Virginia
Saturday, October 5, 2013

Liberty University professor Michael Davis looks at the 1944 presidential election between Democrat Franklin Roosevelt -- seeking an unprecedented fourth term -- and his Republican challenger, Thomas Dewey. With the U.S. and its allies approaching victory in World War II, Roosevelt had a relatively easy victory over Dewey, who mainly campaigned against New Deal programs and for smaller government. Roosevelt would die in office six months after being re-elected, and Vice President Harry Truman became the 33rd president of the United States. Liberty University is in Lynchburg, Virginia.

 

Updated: Monday, October 7, 2013 at 10:53am (ET)

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