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Lectures in History: 1920s Culture & Society

Al Capone

Al Capone

Washington, DC
Saturday, May 11, 2013

In this program, Georgetown University professor Michael Kazin teaches a class on 1920s culture and society. He discusses Prohibition and the exploits of the gangster Al Capone, who eventually went to prison on tax evasion charges. Professor Kazin also talks about the motion picture industry and the new production codes that sought to tamp down on sexuality in films. In addition, he addresses the 1925 Scopes Trial, in which a high school teacher faced charges of unlawfully teaching evolution in a state-funded school. Georgetown University is in Washington, DC.

Updated: Monday, May 13, 2013 at 9:58am (ET)

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