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Journalist Walter Mears on President Kennedy

Walter Mears

Walter Mears

Dallas
Saturday, November 2, 2013

Journalist Walter Mears discusses his experiences covering President Kennedy in the 1960s. Mears recalls his time on Kennedy’s campaign and his personal encounters with the President. He also discusses the assassination from his unique viewpoint as a reporter assigned to the President, and the chaotic days following the event. The Sixth Floor Museum in Dallas, Texas hosted this event. 

Updated: Tuesday, November 5, 2013 at 6:17pm (ET)

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