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Joseph Warren Revere - Paul Revere’s Grandson

Far Hills, New Jersey
Saturday, August 10, 2013

Author William Chemerka talks about his book, “General Joseph Warren Revere: The Gothic Saga of Paul Revere's Grandson.” He traces the life of Joseph Revere, from his time serving in the Navy aboard the U.S.S. Constitution, to his controversial actions at the Civil War Battle of Chancellorsville, where he served as a Union general.

Updated: Tuesday, August 13, 2013 at 10:59am (ET)

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