All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

Joseph Warren Revere - Paul Revere’s Grandson

Far Hills, New Jersey
Saturday, August 10, 2013

Author William Chemerka talks about his book, “General Joseph Warren Revere: The Gothic Saga of Paul Revere's Grandson.” He traces the life of Joseph Revere, from his time serving in the Navy aboard the U.S.S. Constitution, to his controversial actions at the Civil War Battle of Chancellorsville, where he served as a Union general.

Updated: Tuesday, August 13, 2013 at 10:59am (ET)

Related Events

The Civil War: Battle of Chancellorsville
Saturday, April 27, 2013     

Historian Frank O’Reilly of the National Park Service discusses the Battle of Chancellorsville, which was fought from April 30th to May 6th, 1863, in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. The fighting resulted in more than 30,000 total casualities. Historians widely consider the Battle of Chancellorsville to be Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s greatest victory.

American Artifacts: Jackson's Flank Attack at Chancellorsville
Sunday, June 16, 2013     

The Civil War Battle of Chancellorsville was fought April 30 to May 6, 1863, in Spotsylvania County, Virginia. Many historians consider the battle to be Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s greatest victory. Facing a Union Army more than twice the size of his own, Lee divided his forces, sending 27,000 men under “Stonewall” Jackson on a 12-mile march to deliver a flank attack. In this program, we follow two National Park Service historians on a tour as they walk the same ground exactly 150 years after Jackson launched his attack.

American Artifacts: USS Constitution Museum (Part 1)
Sunday, August 19, 2012     

USS Constitution launched in Boston in 1797 and was named by President George Washington for the Constitution of the United States. The ship gained fame during the War of 1812, defeating British warships in three sea battles and earning the nickname “Old Ironsides.” American History TV visited the USS Constitution Museum, located at the same pier in Boston where the ship is docked today. The museum’s president, Anne Grimes Rand, gave us a tour of some of the museum’s exhibits and artifacts, which trace the history of the ship from its construction, to its role in the in the War of 1812, to the present day. 
 

American Artifacts: USS Constitution Museum (Part 2)
Saturday, August 18, 2012     

USS Constitution launched in Boston in 1797 and gained fame during the War of 1812, defeating British warships in three sea battles and earning the nickname “Old Ironsides.” American History TV visited the USS Constitution Museum in Boston, located at the same pier where the ship is docked today. The museum's president, Anne Grimes Rand, gave use a tour of an exhibit looking at the lives of sailors aboard USS Constitution during the War of 1812.

The Presidency: George Washington & the Frontier
Sunday     

After the American Revolution – and before he was elected the first president of the United States – George Washington retired from public life. During that time, he traveled to western Virginia to check on his landholdings. Author Edward Larson talks about this journey and how it contributed to Washington’s interest in western expansion and propelled his efforts to link the east and west through the Potomac River. George Washington’s Mount Vernon hosted this event. 

JFK Assassination and the CIA
Sunday     

Retired U.S. Army Intelligence officer & former NSA executive assistant John Newman discusses declassified documents and codenames related to the CIA, Cuba & the assassination.  Newman is the author of “JFK and Vietnam” and “Oswald and the CIA.” This is part of an Assassination Archives and Research Center conference marking the 50th anniversary of the release of the Warren Commission Report entitled, “The Warren Report and the JFK Assassination: A Half Century of Significant Disclosures.”  

American Artifacts: Russell Senate Office Building
Sunday     

Opened in 1909, the Russell Senate Office Building relieved crowded conditions in the U.S. Capitol. Senate Historian Donald Ritchie explains why the Senate needed to expand and describes some of the many historic investigations that have taken place in the Senate Caucus Room, including the 1912 Titanic & the 1920s Teapot Dome hearings. This is the first of a two-part program.

Multiracial Coalitions & Civil Rights
Sunday     

A former member of the Black Panther Party, Bill Jennings, joins author Lauren Araiza to discuss multiracial coalitions during the civil rights movements of the 1960s and 70s.

Reel America: "A Time for Choosing" - 1964
Sunday     

On October 27, 1964, future president Ronald Reagan delivered a 30-minute television campaign speech for Republican presidential candidate Barry Goldwater. Later titled the "A Time for Choosing" speech, it raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for the Goldwater campaign and helped launch Reagan's political career.

Harry Truman's World War I Service
Sunday     

Author D.M. (Dennis) Giangreco talks about his book, “The Soldier from Independence: A Military History of Harry Truman.” He explores the story of Truman’s role as a field artillery battery commander in World War I. The Kansas City Public Library co-hosted this event with the Truman Library Institute and the National World War I Museum.

Share This Event Via Social Media

Related Resources

C-SPAN on Twitter (late 2012)