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Joint Senate Cmte. Hears About Cybersecurity Executive Order

Washington, DC
Thursday, March 7, 2013

DHS Secretary Janet Napolitano addressed cybersecurity issues at a joint hearing of the Senate Commerce Committee and the Senate Homeland Security Committee.

Senators John Rockefeller (D-WV) and Tom Carper (D-DE) co-chaired the hearing, which examined the Executive Order on cybersecurity issued by President Obama in February 2013. The executive order seeks to strengthen the nation's critical infrastructure through increased information sharing and the development of a "Cybersecurity Framework."

The hearing also aimed to determine if legislation is needed to improve the nation's cybersecurity.

Along with Sec. Napolitano, other witnesses included: Patrick D. Gallagher, undersecretary of Commerce for Standards and Technology; Greg Wilshusen, director, Information Security Issues, Government Accountability Office; and David D. Kepler, chief sustainability officer and chief information officer for Business Services, The Dow Chemical Company.

Updated: Friday, March 8, 2013 at 11:48am (ET)

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