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John F. Kennedy 1961 Presidential Inauguration

John F. Kennedy's 1961 Inauguration

John F. Kennedy's 1961 Inauguration

Washington, DC
Sunday, January 20, 2013

John F. Kennedy's first presidential inauguration took place on January 20, 1961. Two of President Kennedy’s best-known phrases came from his inaugural address: “... we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship ...” and, “... ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.” The U.S. Senate Recording Studio produced this video of highlights from that day's events.

Updated: Monday, January 21, 2013 at 2:43pm (ET)

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