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John C. Fremont: Pathfinder of the West

Savannah, Georgia
Saturday, March 9, 2013

Born in 1813 in Savannah, Georgia, John C. Fremont was an explorer, mapmaker, U.S. Senator for California, two-time Republican presidential candidate, Governor of Arizona territory and a Union General during the Civil War.  “Forrest Gump” author Winston Groom tells stories about the life of the “Pathfinder of the West” at the Georgia History Festival, which is honoring native son Fremont in the bicentennial year of his birth.

Updated: Sunday, March 10, 2013 at 11:53pm (ET)

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