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Jewish Immigrants in New York City 1840-1920

New York City
Saturday, March 9, 2013

Using photographs and first person accounts read by actors, co-authors Annie Polland and Daniel Soyer describe how New York City influenced Jewish immigrants, and how the immigrants in turn transformed the city. Their book “Emerging Metropolis: New York Jews in the Age of Immigration 1840-1920” is part of a NYU Press series called “City of Promises.” This event is from the New York Museum of Jewish Heritage.

Updated: Monday, March 11, 2013 at 12:16am (ET)

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