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Jefferson vs. Hamilton Debate

Thomas Jefferson & Alexander Hamilton

Thomas Jefferson & Alexander Hamilton

Washington, DC
Sunday, March 31, 2013

In the 1790s Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton held clashing views regarding the role and size of the new federal government. Hamilton believed in an active, powerful central government that would nurture commerce, while Jefferson thought that the states must retain enough power to check the central government.  Assuming the roles of Jefferson and Hamilton, two University of Maryland history professors debate the nature of federalism in the new republic. This event was hosted by the Smithsonian Associates.

Updated: Sunday, March 31, 2013 at 4pm (ET)

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