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James Bond: An American Hero

Washington, DC
Saturday, October 12, 2013

History professor Jonathan Nashel speaks at the International Spy Museum in Washington, DC about James Bond – the fictional British Secret Agent 007. Despite having been created by a British author, Nashel argues that Bond is, in many ways, American – a cowboy-like figure who symbolizes the American Dream.

Updated: Monday, October 14, 2013 at 12:27pm (ET)

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