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Jack Ruby Trial

Jack Ruby Shooting Lee Harvey Oswald, November 24, 1963

Jack Ruby Shooting Lee Harvey Oswald, November 24, 1963

Dallas
Saturday, March 30, 2013

Jack Ruby shot and killed Lee Harvey Oswald two days after Oswald assassinated President John F. Kennedy in Dallas on November 24, 1963. J. Waymon Rose, one of the jurors during the highly publicized 1964 trial of Ruby, describes his experience in this program recorded at the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza in Dallas.  

Updated: Sunday, March 31, 2013 at 3pm (ET)

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