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JFK Assassination Conspiracy Theories

President & Mrs. Kennedy in Dallas, Texas (November 22, 1963)

President & Mrs. Kennedy in Dallas, Texas (November 22, 1963)

Pittsburgh
Friday, November 29, 2013

November 22nd marked the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy’s assassination in Dallas. From Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, a conference disputing the U.S. government’s official findings on JFK’s murder. Speakers include Mark Lane, attorney and author of “Rush to Judgment,” and filmmaker Oliver Stone, director of the movie “JFK” and the documentary series “Oliver Stone’s Untold History of the United States.” Duquesne’s Wecht Institute of Forensic Science & Law hosted the event.

Updated: Monday, December 2, 2013 at 11:09am (ET)

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Washington Journal (late 2012)