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Is the American Constitution Worth Preserving?

Princeton, New Jersey
Saturday, July 20, 2013

A scholarly debate about whether the U.S. Constitution is archaic and inefficient, and whether it should remain the basis for the American system of government. The Constitution’s supporters argue for preserving the legacy and ideals of the Founding Fathers. The James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions and the Association for the Study of Free Institutions sponsored this program.

Updated: Saturday, July 20, 2013 at 12:08pm (ET)

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