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Intertribal Summit Brings Youth Leaders to Washington

Washington, DC
Monday, July 30, 2012

The Department of Justice hosts a conference on tribal issues, connecting youth leaders from various American Indian tribes with federal officials for a week-long summit.

The event will feature administration officials from the White House and the Departments of Justice, Interior, Health and Human Services and Energy.

The goals of the summit are to encourage leadership skills in tribal youth, and to discuss issues, like education, health, cultural preservation, civic engagement, and leadership development for their tribal governments and community members, that are important to the tribal community.

Monday's speakers include:

  • Eugenia Tyner-Dawson, Senior Advisor to the Assistant Attorney General for Tribal Affairs, Office of Justice Programs, Department of Justice
  • Melodee Hanes, Acting Administrator, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office of Justice Programs, Department of Justice
  • Mary Lou Leary, Acting Assistant Attorney General, Office of Justice Programs, Department of Justice
  • Tony West, Acting Associate Attorney General for the Department of Justice
  • Brendan V. Johnson, U.S. Attorney for the District of South Dakota, Chairman of the Native American Issues Subcommittee of the Attorney General’s Advisory Committee
  • Dr. Yvette Roubideaux, Director, Indian Health Service, Department of Health and Human Services
  • Lillian A. Sparks, Commissioner, Administration on Native Americans, Administration for Children and Families, Department of Health and Human Services

 

Updated: Monday, July 30, 2012 at 5:37pm (ET)

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