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Interpreting the U.S. Constitution

Shepherdstown, West Virginia
Sunday, October 13, 2013

Historian Raymond Smock focuses on the U.S. Constitution, examining how lawmakers have struggled with interpreting the document for centuries. Smock served as historian for the U.S. House of Representatives from 1983 to 1995, and is now the director of the Robert C. Byrd Center for Legislative Studies. This event took place on Constitution Day, September 17th.

Updated: Monday, October 14, 2013 at 5:27pm (ET)

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