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Impact of the 1960s Cultural Revolution

March on the Pentagon, 1967

March on the Pentagon, 1967

Princeton, New Jersey
Saturday, August 31, 2013

A panel of historians examines the impact of the 1960s Cultural Revolution on American society. They argue that the '60s brought a decline of confidence in institutions and authority, the growth of political cynicism and transformation of popular culture and values. Princeton University's James Madison Program in America Ideals and Institutions and the Association for the Study of Free Institutions co-hosted this program.

Updated: Saturday, August 31, 2013 at 4:34pm (ET)

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