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Identifying Human Remains from the USS Monitor

"Crew of Monitor, Hampton Roads, Va. 1862"

Newport News, Virginia
Saturday, March 24, 2012

The Mariners’ Museum in Newport News, Virginia hosted a Civil War Navy Conference in early March to mark the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Hampton Roads, when for the first time, ironclads battled during the Civil War. In this session, David Alberg of the Monitor National Marine Sanctuary talks about the recovery and identification of human remains from the USS Monitor, the Union ship that faced off with the CSS Virginia near Hampton Roads in 1862. We also hear from genealogist Lisa Stansbury.

Updated: Thursday, March 15, 2012 at 3:38pm (ET)

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