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Hollywood and Nazi Germany

Washington, DC
Saturday, December 28, 2013

Historian & author Ben Urwand visits the National Archives to discuss his book, “The Collaboration: Hollywood’s Pact with Hitler.” Using newly discovered archival material, Urwand claims that to continue doing business in Germany during the 1930s – including after Hitler’s rise to power, and Kristallnacht - studios agreed not to make films criticizing the Nazis or their persecution of the Jews. Ben Urwand argues that all the major Hollywood studios collaborated with the German propaganda ministry – despite the fact that many studio heads were Jewish.
 

Updated: Monday, December 30, 2013 at 10:51am (ET)

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