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Hollywood Stars Discuss the 1963 March on Washington

James Baldwin & Marlon Brando at the 1963 March on Washington

James Baldwin & Marlon Brando at the 1963 March on Washington

Washington, DC
Sunday, August 25, 2013

On August 28, 1963 -- the date of the historic March on Washington -- the U.S. Information Agency filmed this roundtable discussion with march participants Sidney Poitier, Charlton Heston, Marlon Brando, James Baldwin and Harry Belafonte.

Updated: Monday, August 26, 2013 at 10:47am (ET)

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