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Hitlerland: American Eyewitnesses to the Nazi Rise to Power

Adolf Hitler Arriving at Krollopers House in Berlin, 1934

Adolf Hitler Arriving at Krollopers House in Berlin, 1934

New York City
Saturday, July 21, 2012

In this program, author Andrew Nagorski discusses his book, “Hitlerland: American Eyewitnesses to the Nazi Rise to Power.” The book highlights American life in Germany during the emergence of the Third Reich as seen through the eyes of diplomats, expats, athletes and military personnel. This event in New York City was co-hosted by the Leo Baeck Institute and the American Council on Germany.

Updated: Saturday, July 7, 2012 at 11:54am (ET)

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