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History of Supplemental Security Income

An announcement for SSI from 1973

An announcement for SSI from 1973

Washington, DC
Monday, December 23, 2013

Created in 1972 by President Richard Nixon, the Supplemental Security Income, or SSI, provides benefits to low-income elderly, disabled, and blind Americans. In this program, author and historian Edward Berkowitz details the origins and history of this policy, which has gone through numerous, sometimes drastic, changes since its inception. He argues that policy-makers should examine the program from a historical perspective, as the media and politicians often altered the public’s view of the SSI and “welfare” in general. This event was co-hosted by the Woodrow Wilson Center and the National History Center.
 

Updated: Wednesday, January 1, 2014 at 2:20pm (ET)

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