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History of the Proclamation of 1763

The Proclamation of 1763 came at the end of the Seven Years' War

The Proclamation of 1763 came at the end of the Seven Years' War

Boston
Sunday, December 1, 2013

In 1763, at the end of the French & Indian War, the British issued a Proclamation that established boundaries of the British colonies in North America and forbade colonists from settling west of the Appalachians in Indian territory. To the British, the Proclamation was a sensible way to prevent conflict between the colonists and Native Americans. Many colonists objected, however, and viewed the Proclamation as interference in colonial affairs.

In this program historians discuss the Proclamation's effect on Native Americans, and argue that it worsened the relationship between the colonies and Great Britain.

Updated: Wednesday, January 1, 2014 at 2:45pm (ET)

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