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History of the Coca-Cola Company

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1890s Coca-Cola Advertisement

Atlanta, Georgia
Monday, May 26, 2014

From the Organization of American Historians 2014 annual meeting in Atlanta, a conversation with author Bartow Elmore about his book "Citizen Coke: The Making of Coca-Cola Capitalism." 

Updated: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 at 9:28am (ET)

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