All Weekend, Every Weekend. On C-SPAN3.

History of the Act of Voting

Voting in Philadelphia, 1864

Voting in Philadelphia, 1864

Washington, DC
Sunday, May 11, 2014

Author and history professor Sophia Rosenfeld discusses the history and role of the secret ballot in America. She describes voting techniques used following the Revolution and talks about the relationship between voting and freedom in the modern world.

Updated: Monday, May 12, 2014 at 9:45am (ET)

Related Events

The Presidency: Voting Rights in the Kennedy Years
Sunday, February 13, 2011     

The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum recently hosted a discussion about the Kennedy Administration’s strategy to overcome voting discrimination in the South. Participants include a former Assistant Attorney General, a onetime lawyer in the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department, and the daughter of a key witness in a voting rights case.
 

90th Anniversary of Women’s Suffrage
Saturday, October 2, 2010     

Ninety years ago, Congress ratified the Nineteenth Amendment granting women the right to vote. Suffragists crusaded for decades to bring about the change before the Amendment was passed in 1920. Historians spoke at the National Archives about the lasting impact of the Amendment on race and gender relations in the United States.

American Artifacts: Alice Paul & the Women's Suffrage Movement
Sunday, December 12, 2010     

C-SPAN visited the Sewall-Belmont House and Museum on Capitol Hill to learn about the protests that helped lead to the 19th Amendment.

Press Coverage of Women's Suffrage Movement
Sunday, March 3, 2013     

100 years ago, on March 3, 1913, thousands of American women marched down Pennsylvania Avenue to the White House in support of women’s suffrage. It was another seven years before women received the vote with the signing of the 19th Amendment, but the march marked a turning point in the movement. To commemorate the anniversary, journalists and authors gathered at the National Press Club to discuss the significance of the march and the national and international press coverage it received.

Expert Examines Role of African American Voters
Wednesday, November 7, 2012     

Political expert Dr. David Bositis discusses the role of the African American vote in Campaign 2012. 

Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall
Sunday     

Historians and law professors met at the University of Baltimore Law School to discuss Mick Caouette’s film “Mr. Civil Rights: Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP.” They explored Marshall’s early law career as well as his work in the South to expand voting rights for African Americans. We also hear about his arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court, and how he became the first African American appointed to the highest court in the land.  

The Presidency: John Quincy Adams
Sunday     

A conversation with author Fred Kaplan about his biography, “John Quincy Adams: American Visionary.” Although he was not remembered for being a great president, Fred Kaplan argues that John Quincy Adams was one of the most intellectual commanders in chief, and also the best Secretary of State in American history. The New-York Historical Society hosted this event. 

Herbert Hoover, Henry Wallace & Cold War America
Sunday     

American History TV traveled to the Library of Congress Kluge Center in Washington, DC, which was established in 2000 and endowed by philanthropist John W. Kluge. The center welcomes over 100 scholars every year to pursue their research interests at one of the world's largest libraries. We spoke with Vanderbilt University lecturer Kevin Kim about his upcoming book about Herbert Hoover and Henry Wallace, and their impact on America's Cold War policy.

Naval Warfare in the American Revolution
Sunday     

Historian Dennis Conrad of the Naval History and Heritage Command discusses how strategies used by colonial naval captains contributed to the success of the American Revolution. Mr. Conrad also describes how ships from the colonies – then called the Continental Navy-- fought not just in the Atlantic but also saw action as far away as the Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean. This event was sponsored by the Society of Cincinnati and took place at the Anderson House in Washington D.C. 

American Artifacts: The National Garden
Sunday     

From the founding of the United States, George Washington encouraged the creation of a botanic garden in the nation’s capital that would inspire and educate citizens on plants and their uses. This vision was realized in 1820 when Congress created the U.S. Botanic Garden on the capitol grounds.  The most recent addition, the National Garden, features plants of the Mid-Atlantic, including a Rose Garden and Regional Garden.  Plant curator Bill McLaughlin explained the history and use of some of the country’s indigenous plants by Native Americans, colonials, and others.

Share This Event Via Social Media
C-SPAN on Twitter (late 2012)