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History of Women’s Roles in American Finance

Women's Liberty Loan Committee, 1917

Women's Liberty Loan Committee, 1917

New York City
Saturday, November 9, 2013

Sheri Caplan, the author of “Petticoats and Pinstripes: Portraits of Women in Wall Street’s History,” discusses how women played an important role in the development of American finance. She argues that World War I acted as the watershed moment for women who entered the financial world --- they saw it as part of their patriotic duty. This event took place at the Museum of American Finance in New York City.

Updated: Tuesday, November 5, 2013 at 4:54pm (ET)

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