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History of Vagrancy Laws from 1952-72

Washington, DC
Saturday, February 22, 2014

University of Virginia Law and History professor Risa Goluboff discusses vagrancy laws from the 1950s to early '70s. These laws, which the Supreme Court ruled unconstitutional in 1972, criminalized poverty and idleness and were sometimes used to target African Americans, Communists, and gays and lesbians. Risa Goluboff teaches twentieth century American Constitutional and Legal History and is the author of The Lost Promise of Civil Rights and the upcoming book People Out of Place: A Constitutional History of the Long 1960s. The Woodrow Wilson Center and the National History Center of the American Historical Association co-hosted the event. 

Updated: Saturday, February 22, 2014 at 10:27am (ET)

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